something to ponder

Here's a head-scratcher:

Most cultural conservatives -- not all, but most -- are opposed to multiculturalism. They believe that Western civilization is superior, that English literature should be taught in schools and not Chinese literature, that classical Roman mythology should be emphasized and that of the Native Americans given little if any mention, that French and German history is more relevant than that of India or Japan.

However, if you suggest that contemporary England, Germany, France, or Italy might have some useful examples of modern political solutions (in, say, the field of health care), if you say that these nations might have some useful ideas, many of these same people will tell you that you're un-American, that you ought to move to Europe and stop trying to change America.

So, can anyone tell me when exactly the dividing line is? When did Europe stop being the font of all that is good and civilized and an example that we should study and follow, and start becoming the embodiment of decadence?

Tags: 

Comments

You're taking them at their word and that is confusing you.

What it comes down to isn't that they fetishize Western Civilization, it's that they fetishize America and can't tell the difference. So the things they see as the antecedents to America are Good and Right and Worthy, but once America shows up, that's where all the virtue goes.

You know how most Christians treat Judaism and the "Old Testament"? The way Jews are basically seen as people who missed the boat and the entire value of Judaism is in leading up (and being replaced by) Christianity? It's exactly like that.

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.